• What Goes On in a Teenage Brain? by Dr Jack Lewis

    At the onset of puberty the grey matter reaches maximum thickness and that key process of maturation, neuronal pruning, begins in the adolescent brain. This process does not occur uniformly across the whole brain but instead starts at the back of the brain and gradually progresses towards the front over a period of several years. Research at the National Institute of Mental Health in the US has tracked these changes using MRI to create a colour-coded animation that gradually progresses from an early teenage brain to a late teenage brain with red indicating where the grey matter is thickest, yellow a little thinner, green a little thinner again and finally the thinnest (and most mature) brain areas in blue:

    If you pause the video after about 2-3s you can see the status of the brain in the mid-teens – it is quite literally suspended half way between the adult and child form – some brain areas have fully matured by this point in life (blue), but there is a vast patchwork of reds, yellows and greens indicating many brain areas that are still in their childlike form. If you re-start the video you’ll notice right at the end the very last brain area to go from “almost mature” green to “fully mature” blue is at the front of the brain, within the prefrontal cortex. The dorsolateral part of the prefrontal cortex (the upper side parts of the brain region residing behind your forehead) is responsible for impulse control in the mature fully developed brain.

    Adults who have brain damage in areas of the prefrontal cortex lose their ability to control their anger – reacting in a highly aggressive manner at the slightest provocation. Remind you of anyone? When the hormones of adolescence are running riot, teenagers can often find themselves in situations that induce feelings of helplessness and frustration, which invariably finds expression as anger. This happens because prefrontal brain areas that are used to exert control over impulsive behaviours in adults are not yet fully developed. The important thing to remember is that late development of these important brain areas is not necessarily a mistake and may not, frustrating as it may be for the poor, long-suffering parents, be a bad thing. The inability of teens to control their aggression and arguments that their crankiness causes may actually help to break reliance on parental support, encouraging them to test the waters of independence in preparation for independent adult life.

    In addition to these brainblogs you can follow Dr Jack on Twitter to catch his daily #braintweet.

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  • How Teens Learn So Much So Quickly by Dr Jack Lewis

    High neuroplasticity means kids seem to absorb new information like a sponge

    Neuroplasticity – the ability of the brain to adapt to the specific demands of the environments in which a person spends their waking hours. It occurs via reinforcement of connections between some brain cells (neurons) and weakening those between others. Neuroplasticity is at an all time high during childhood. This is primarily why kids seem to be able to absorb information like a sponge and pick up new skills so effortlessly.

    Children’s brains are in a special, highly-adaptive state, enabling them to pick up new abilities very easily and develop a large repertoire of them very rapidly in preparation for adult life. That’s not to say that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks – it’s just that older brains have to put in more time and effort to pick up new skills. As with all things, the more you do something the easier it becomes. It may sound odd but, in a manner of speaking, you need to learn to learn, and then it comes easy. Older people tend to not bother trying to learn as intensively as during childhood, so when they do try, as they are out of the habit of learning, it all seems much harder. The trick is to never stop learning. Get back in the habit of learning, as you were naturally inclined to be during childhood, and learning becomes much easier, because your brain goes back into the “learning mode” i.e. your brain’s neuroplasticity increases.

    The more a specific mental function is practiced, whether performing coordinated body movements, reading, engaging in conversation, experimenting with imagination, music, gadgets, whatever, the quicker, more accurately and more easily it can be performed the next time round. From day-to-day these improvements are usually not very noticable. But across a timeframe of weeks or months these tiny, incremental progressions add up into great leaps forward.

    Practice means more brain connections and better mental function

    Any particular mental function involves a different set of brain areas that must communicate with each other via rapid fire electrical messages. Connections between brain areas that regularly work together to perform a specific mental function are strengthened, whilst others that are rarely used are eventually chopped away. That is one of the most surprising findings about brain development. You would think that the more you learn the more brain cells are created and the brain gets larger. In actual fact the complete opposite is true. Over the course of adolescence, as the ability to write, calculate, communicate, use tools, acquire knowledge and many other skills improve, a whopping great 33% of the brain’s neurons are trimmed away. And that’s a fact. Adolescence is all about pruning away brain cells that aren’t providing a useful function in order to free up precious resources and make way for extra connections to be made between brain cells that ARE often used.

    The grey matter (crinkly outer layer) contains synapses that connect neurons together

    The upshot is that the more complex, rich and varied a person’s experiences over the course of their childhood, the more complex, rich and varied the connections between its brain cells; ultimately translating into a broader repertoire of capabilities. The importance of a parent’s influence on the development of a child’s brain cannot be over-emphasised. Parents either do or do not provide a stimulating environment in which to stretch and challenge their child’s brain. They may or may not efficiently guide, nurture and encourage the development of skills, new experiences and abilities. This does not have to incur expense. Encouraging a young brain to explore and engage with their environment, to communicate openly and to feel free to ask as many questions as they want is key to enabling a brain to develop.

    In addition to these weekly blogs you can follow Dr Jack on twitter to catch his daily #braintweet.

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  • Dr Jack’s Memory Clinic on ITV1′s THIS MORNING – Mon 13th June 2011

    Dr Jack will be MAKING YOUR BRAIN BETTER FOR LONGER live on ITV1′s THIS MORNING

    Dr Jack’s first appearance was on Mon 13th June covering the topic of how to improve your memory

    Over the summer I’ll be making a series of contributions to ITV’s THIS MORNING. The aim is to get the nation interested in how their brains work and ultimately to help YOU get the most out of YOUR brain. I’ll offer easy-to-follow advice on how to get your brain firing on all cylinders each and every day.

    I’ll be answering the questions that YOU want answered. Is your brain not what it used to be? Want to know what you can do about it? Bad with money? Ever wondered why you can’t kick your habits? Ever worry about your children’s development? You can either get in touch with your questions directly by clicking here, or get in touch with THIS MORNING via The Hub.

    Topics I’ll be covering in detail will range from money management to memory, from love to hate, from happiness to sorrow, and all the way from child development to holding onto your marbles in old age. You most definitely CAN teach an old dog new tricks and it is never too late to start getting more out of your brain!

    Each item will kick off with a discussion with Phillip Schofield and Co. on the sofa to explore ways in which they feel their own brains’ work well and not-so-well.  We’ll then be asking members of the public to participate in experiments live in the studio. And we’ll meet some extraordinary people who’ll either demonstrate some amazing abilities or some shocking disabilities. Each item will be packed with useful tips, nudges and strategies for optimising your brain function. So, each week, you’ll be able to put my advice to the test to see how it can benefit your life by boosting your brain power.

    Most people would agree that their memories are far from perfect. So, on Monday 13th June 2011, I’ll be showing you what part of your brain creates a MEMORY for people, places, facts and faces. I’ll be putting some members of the public through their paces to see how much information a noraml “working” memory can hold. You’ll even be able to join in the fun and play along at home. I’ll reveal a classic memory trick that is virtually guaranteed to boost anyone’s memory for lists of facts or any other kind of information you might need to remember.

    So tune into ITV1 from 10:30-12:30 and SORT YOUR BRAIN OUT!

    Academic credentials:

    • Jack has studied Brain Biology for nearly 20 years
    • Jack has a First Class batchelor’s degree in Neuroscience from The University Of Nottingham
    • Jack earned his PhD in the Laboratory of Neurobiology at University College London
    • Last year, Jack published a paper in the prestigious Journal of Neuroscience describing human brain scanning experiments that investigated multisensory perception; carried out during a post-doc at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
    • Despite Jack’s extensive knowledge about the human brain, he is NOT medically qualified and so will not be able to answer questions relating to medical care.
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