• Brain Benefits of Beat City (Nintendo DS) by Dr Jack

    Beat City is a fun music game that might even improve your brain!

    This is a review of “Beat City” – a Nintendo DS (2D) game that I believe has all the hallmarks of something that, although designed purely for pleasure, may actually improve brain function. A recent scientific review outlined several video games that, despite being developed only with gameplay and sales in mind, were nonetheless found to improve visual perception, sustained attention, task switching, rapid option selection and several other vital aspects of cognition. With this in mind I’ve been keeping an eye out for other games that might fall into this category.

    Kids who play a musical instrument boast better language development than their peers who do not. The Einstein Aging Study found that elderly participants who regularly play a musical instrument exhibited greater cognitive reserve than those that did not – helping them keep the ravages of Alzheimer’s at bay for longer.

    The upshot is that whether you’re very old, very young or somewhere in between, not only can playing a musical instrument create a torrent of activity in your brain’s pleasure pathways, but it can also be of long term benefit for a variety of different brain areas that support several cognitive functions.

    Beat City involves travelling around a comic book stylised world on a mission to bring music back into the lives of local inhabitants – by tapping along to the beat of a variety of electronic tunes. You are the “Synchroniser,” a brave inhabitant of Beat City who is hell-bent on freeing his fellow citizens from their banal tuneless existence. En route you encounter several bizarre characters with whom you must do battle by tapping, swiping and holding the beat in time to music of varying complexity. Although upon first appearances it may seem to be aimed at younger audiences, this game gets tough – tough enough to provide even those naturally musical people out there (even my girlfriend who reached grade 8 in three different musical instruments!) with a challenge as you progress through harder and harder levels.

    For the rest of us even the early levels can prove quite taxing. Hitting a rich vein of form is rewarded with a visual technicolour treat. The muted greys of Beat City are yanked out of their dreary and monotonous existence by your beat perfect music making, with the screen springing into life with a vivid burst of colour (and the characters ending up wearing increasingly bizarre fancy dress outfits.)

    Sounds that reach the ears are split up into different frequencies on the upper temporal lobe’s upper surfaces and then passed on to adjacent areas for further analysis

    Reproducing a beat with accurate timing taxes a fair few different brain areas. The auditory cortex – distributed predominantly across the upper level of the temporal lobes (see diagram on the right) – crunches the soundwaves into what we actually hear through a division of labour across different patches of brain cortex which each extract different types of information. Firstly, the sound is separated out into its different frequencies at the cochlea in the inner ear and ferried to the primary auditory cortex (shown inset on the right).  Some specialist areas are involved in establishing the rhythm.  Others find and create the perception of melody. Functional units residing predominantly in left side of most people’s brain will extract the meaning from words in a song. Others, mainly in the right half of the brain, extract the emotional tone of the music. Then there are the brain areas involved in tapping along to the beat: pre-motor regions of the frontal cortex plan the movements and the motor strip triggers them. In order to get the timing just right, the cerebellum – hanging off the back of the brain – finesses the signal on its journey from brain to finger muscles to ensure that the stylus hits the touch screen precisely in time with the beat as opposed to a little too early or late. In Beat City, the accuracy with which you time each tap is indicated on screen by the size and colour of a musical note.

    Tapping to the rhythm increases communication between brain areas involved in beat perception and rhythmical movement

    To recap: different brain areas simultaneously extract different features from the sounds that reach the ear to creates sense of hearing in our everyday lives. Patterns in the sound are automatically extracted and we naturally anticipate when the next sound is likely to occur, enabling us to synchronise our actions according to the patterns in the sounds. This instinctive impact of rhythmical sound on movement is where the urge to dance comes from.

    Clapping, singing or playing a musical instrument requires different cognitive functions to operate simultaneously and interactively. Having to listen to, follow the rhythm of and anticipate changes in a musical score in order to producing carefully coordinated finger, hand (and for wind instruments: also mouth and respiratory tract) movements is a highly cognitively demanding task. Growth of extra connections (and therefore increased efficiency) in brain areas involved in perceiving sounds and producing accurately timed, precise, carefully coordinated movements are just the front and back ends of the brain workout.

    In addition, prefrontal brain areas responsible for working memory, anticipation, vigilance, error correction and many other cognitive functions are also put through their paces by virtue of having to ensure that the two processes are properly integrated.

    At the end of the day even if Beat City doesn’t inspire the desire to play a proper musical instrument, enabling the full brain-benefits of musical engagement to be earned, I believe it is nonetheless an effective way of challenging and thus improve your capacity for working memory, concentration and fine motor control that will come in useful in everyday life as well.

    In addition to these brain posts you can catch my daily #braintweet by following me on Twitter.

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  • How Teens Learn So Much So Quickly by Dr Jack Lewis

    High neuroplasticity means kids seem to absorb new information like a sponge

    Neuroplasticity – the ability of the brain to adapt to the specific demands of the environments in which a person spends their waking hours. It occurs via reinforcement of connections between some brain cells (neurons) and weakening those between others. Neuroplasticity is at an all time high during childhood. This is primarily why kids seem to be able to absorb information like a sponge and pick up new skills so effortlessly.

    Children’s brains are in a special, highly-adaptive state, enabling them to pick up new abilities very easily and develop a large repertoire of them very rapidly in preparation for adult life. That’s not to say that you cannot teach an old dog new tricks – it’s just that older brains have to put in more time and effort to pick up new skills. As with all things, the more you do something the easier it becomes. It may sound odd but, in a manner of speaking, you need to learn to learn, and then it comes easy. Older people tend to not bother trying to learn as intensively as during childhood, so when they do try, as they are out of the habit of learning, it all seems much harder. The trick is to never stop learning. Get back in the habit of learning, as you were naturally inclined to be during childhood, and learning becomes much easier, because your brain goes back into the “learning mode” i.e. your brain’s neuroplasticity increases.

    The more a specific mental function is practiced, whether performing coordinated body movements, reading, engaging in conversation, experimenting with imagination, music, gadgets, whatever, the quicker, more accurately and more easily it can be performed the next time round. From day-to-day these improvements are usually not very noticable. But across a timeframe of weeks or months these tiny, incremental progressions add up into great leaps forward.

    Practice means more brain connections and better mental function

    Any particular mental function involves a different set of brain areas that must communicate with each other via rapid fire electrical messages. Connections between brain areas that regularly work together to perform a specific mental function are strengthened, whilst others that are rarely used are eventually chopped away. That is one of the most surprising findings about brain development. You would think that the more you learn the more brain cells are created and the brain gets larger. In actual fact the complete opposite is true. Over the course of adolescence, as the ability to write, calculate, communicate, use tools, acquire knowledge and many other skills improve, a whopping great 33% of the brain’s neurons are trimmed away. And that’s a fact. Adolescence is all about pruning away brain cells that aren’t providing a useful function in order to free up precious resources and make way for extra connections to be made between brain cells that ARE often used.

    The grey matter (crinkly outer layer) contains synapses that connect neurons together

    The upshot is that the more complex, rich and varied a person’s experiences over the course of their childhood, the more complex, rich and varied the connections between its brain cells; ultimately translating into a broader repertoire of capabilities. The importance of a parent’s influence on the development of a child’s brain cannot be over-emphasised. Parents either do or do not provide a stimulating environment in which to stretch and challenge their child’s brain. They may or may not efficiently guide, nurture and encourage the development of skills, new experiences and abilities. This does not have to incur expense. Encouraging a young brain to explore and engage with their environment, to communicate openly and to feel free to ask as many questions as they want is key to enabling a brain to develop.

    In addition to these weekly blogs you can follow Dr Jack on twitter to catch his daily #braintweet.

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  • Dr Jack’s Memory Clinic on ITV1′s THIS MORNING – Mon 13th June 2011

    Dr Jack will be MAKING YOUR BRAIN BETTER FOR LONGER live on ITV1′s THIS MORNING

    Dr Jack’s first appearance was on Mon 13th June covering the topic of how to improve your memory

    Over the summer I’ll be making a series of contributions to ITV’s THIS MORNING. The aim is to get the nation interested in how their brains work and ultimately to help YOU get the most out of YOUR brain. I’ll offer easy-to-follow advice on how to get your brain firing on all cylinders each and every day.

    I’ll be answering the questions that YOU want answered. Is your brain not what it used to be? Want to know what you can do about it? Bad with money? Ever wondered why you can’t kick your habits? Ever worry about your children’s development? You can either get in touch with your questions directly by clicking here, or get in touch with THIS MORNING via The Hub.

    Topics I’ll be covering in detail will range from money management to memory, from love to hate, from happiness to sorrow, and all the way from child development to holding onto your marbles in old age. You most definitely CAN teach an old dog new tricks and it is never too late to start getting more out of your brain!

    Each item will kick off with a discussion with Phillip Schofield and Co. on the sofa to explore ways in which they feel their own brains’ work well and not-so-well.  We’ll then be asking members of the public to participate in experiments live in the studio. And we’ll meet some extraordinary people who’ll either demonstrate some amazing abilities or some shocking disabilities. Each item will be packed with useful tips, nudges and strategies for optimising your brain function. So, each week, you’ll be able to put my advice to the test to see how it can benefit your life by boosting your brain power.

    Most people would agree that their memories are far from perfect. So, on Monday 13th June 2011, I’ll be showing you what part of your brain creates a MEMORY for people, places, facts and faces. I’ll be putting some members of the public through their paces to see how much information a noraml “working” memory can hold. You’ll even be able to join in the fun and play along at home. I’ll reveal a classic memory trick that is virtually guaranteed to boost anyone’s memory for lists of facts or any other kind of information you might need to remember.

    So tune into ITV1 from 10:30-12:30 and SORT YOUR BRAIN OUT!

    Academic credentials:

    • Jack has studied Brain Biology for nearly 20 years
    • Jack has a First Class batchelor’s degree in Neuroscience from The University Of Nottingham
    • Jack earned his PhD in the Laboratory of Neurobiology at University College London
    • Last year, Jack published a paper in the prestigious Journal of Neuroscience describing human brain scanning experiments that investigated multisensory perception; carried out during a post-doc at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics
    • Despite Jack’s extensive knowledge about the human brain, he is NOT medically qualified and so will not be able to answer questions relating to medical care.
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